Public Relations Blog

 desert2019

The Pennsylvania Railroad Technical & Historical Society (PRRT&HS) held its 51st annual meeting May 15-19 in Lancaster, Pa. The event was hosted by the Philadelphia Chapter. Attendance was over four hundred.

​The event kicked off on Wednesday evening with several hours of movies. I live too close to warrant a hotel, but too far to warrant the extra trip in, so I did not attend the first night.

The event kicked into full gear on Thursday, with concurrent sessions running from 9 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. with breaks for lunch and dinner. There were 24 unique clinics with most presented twice, so it was relatively easy to work out a schedule.

 

rpm logo crop1I just returned from RPM EAST held in Greensburg, Pennsylvania. This event is held in odd-numbered years to offset the RPM Valley Forge held in Malvern, Pennsylvania in even-numbered years. This was my first time at the Greensburg event and it did not disappoint. A "shout out" to Eric Hannsman, Don Coulter, and the rest of the crew that put this event together.

There were eight model railroads open for operating sessions on Thursday evening, though I did not arrive until Friday. There were 14 model railroads open on Sunday for open houses; due to time constraints, I did not make it to any of these either. So, that all said...

Several months ago I started listening to several podcasts related to model railroading. They are actually quite enjoyable. One that I listen to regularly is Lionel Strang's A Modeler's Life. They interview model railroaders and bring out their background in the hobby. Reflecting on my own past, I decided to share where I got my start.

Born in 1962, I got my first train set at a very young age... no later than seven, but I really don't remember. The HO scale set included a Mantua GP in Reading yellow and green livery. Many years later it would take a nose dive off the layout due to a sibling which resulted in breaking the short hood off.

The first layout was on a sheet of plywood laying on top of a pool table. From an Atlas plan book, it was a basic figure eight with the Atlas pier set. Never got to scenery and, quite frankly, I don't remember running in much.

A recent thread on the Atlas Forum asked "What model railroads inspired you?" It challenged readers to recollect before responding. Responses were typically in list form, but I'd like to share my list with justification, in no particular order...

Without a doubt, I can point to Bruce Chubb's Sunset Valley Lines as my original inspiration. As a teen, I was glued to the series in Model Railroader. It was my first exposure to the concept of "operations" on a model railroad.

Allen McClellan's Virginian & Ohio is probably on everyone's list. I was late to the party as I was not a Railroad Model Craftsmansubscriber at the time, or perhaps that was when I was at college and my hobby was boxed up. In any case, it was in the late 1980s or even the 1990s that I was enlightened by Allen's work. His "beyond the basement" approach opened up a whole new realm of possibilities.

kellyquestions

Your superintendent has faced The Kelly Questions on A Modeler's Life. As announced by Lionel Strang...

Download this podcast at: amodelerslife.com

Kelly Questions - Jerry Britton

Still trying to decide between crunchy and smooth peanut butter, your router keeps giving you different directions to your bedroom, Alexa refuses to play any of your favorite Kiss Cover band songs.  

We can’t help with any of that but we can help you become comatose as you listen to Jerry Britton try his hand at answering the Kelly questions.

Enjoy.