Public Relations Blog

The Pennsylvania Midland Railroad, as described in this series of articles, is a freelance railroad created by Jerry Britton. The railroad is inspired by actual events and histories of related railroads in Mifflin and Centre counties of Pennsylvania. Past history is not changed, but leveraged to create future outcomes that never came to fruition.

The establishment of the Pennsylvania Midland was not lost on the Bellefonte Central Railroad(BFC) to the north. The BFC had long sought a way to increase freight income via a connection with the PRR to the south, rather than at nearby Bellefonte. They had failed in their efforts to establish such a connection via Spruce Creek, Huntingdon, and most recently, Tyrone.

The Pennsylvania Midland Railroad, as described in this series of articles, is a freelance railroad created by Jerry Britton. The railroad is inspired by actual events and histories of related railroads in Mifflin and Centre counties of Pennsylvania. Past history is not changed, but leveraged to create future outcomes that never came to fruition.

It was the mid 1930s. The Britton family, longtime residents of the "Big Valley" in Mifflin county, discovered substantial sand deposits on their land on the north side of Jacks Mountain. This shouldn't have come as a surprise, as the north side of Stone Mountain, next door to the north, had been quarried for sand for years. The Pennsylvania Glass Sand Company had a substantial processing plant on the banks of the Juniata River at Mill Creek and trucked sand from the nearby quarries to the plant. The plant had multiple sidings connecting to the Pennsylvania Railroad at that location.

The PRR Middle Division has re-enacted the famous St. Patrick's Day flood of 1936. True to prototype, it was unplanned!

York Haven Shops Floods

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The plan for the Middle Division was to use the entire basement, once the kids were both off to college... another five years. But even then, the plan was to traverse room to room via a window cut in each wall. Not the ideal situation, but...

Open up nearly any coffee table photo book on the Pennsylvania Railroad and you'll see references to Red Bank, South Amboy, and Bay Head Junction. These locations are known for being the last pasture for steam, as well as diesels that have fallen out of favor, like the Baldwin BP20 passenger sharks. However, I've lacked an understanding and appreciation of how and where these locations fit into the Pennsylvania Railroad system.

I now know that they are part of the New York & Long Branch (NY&LB), a railroad jointly operated by the PRR and the Central Railroad of New Jersey (CNJ). Unlike most PRR affiliations, however, they aren't documented in regular PRR documentation, like the employee timetables or regional maps. Perhaps that's what led to my oversight.