enola

The information presented following was cumulated from the January 1955 edition of the ORER (Official Railroad Equipment Register). The data pages for the Pennsylvania Railroad indicate that the data is current as of October 1, 1954.

Subclasses are tallied separately, with the exception of H21a, H21b, and H21e hopper cars which which were listed in different combinations, but combined here as "H21a & variants".

The list only takes into account equipment available for interchange, so does not include miscellaneous and maintenance of way equipment. 

The referenced HO scale models are listed based on how the cars are lettered... not what they best represent. Some cars show comments as to their appropriateness, while cars that have not been evaluated are followed by a "(?)". "(OOB)" indicates that the manufacturer is out of business.

My compilation shows a total fleet of 183,689 cars available for interchange, broken out by Box, Gondola, Stock, Coke, Hopper, and Flat car types.

299x132 2D F8

 

Interpretation of Truck Classification
SymbolRefers to
First Number of axles per truck
Second A.A.R. Class letter for journal dia. only (see below)
Third Dash-for standard A.A.R. axle
number-for numerical deviation from A.A.R. standard
Fourth Service of truck. F=Freight, P=Passenger, T=Tender
Fifth Consecutive design of truck for class
Sixth Modification to truck design
A.A.R. ClassABCDEF
Journal size (in.) 3-3/4x7 4-1/4x8 5x9 5-1/2x10 6x11 6-1/2x12
Capy. per axle 15000 24000 32000 40000 50000 60000

 

 

Employee timetables provide a treasure trove of information about a division. They were typically updated in April and September. They include listings of interlockings and block stations, passenger train schedules, arranged freight train schedules, and rules specific to the division.

robert gunnarssonbill caloroso 

The Northern Central Railway (NCRY) caught my attention early in my love for the Pennsy. Two excellent reads on the line are Robert Gunnarsson's The Story of the Northern Central Railway and Bill Caloroso's Pennsylvania Railroad's Elmira Branch (pictured above).

The Northern Central Railway was a Class I Railroad connecting Baltimore, Maryland with Sunbury, Pennsylvania, along the Susquehanna River. Completed in 1858, the line came under the control of the Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR) in 1861, when the PRR acquired a controlling interest in the Northern Central's stock to compete with the rival Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (B&O). For eleven decades the Northern Central operated as a subsidiary of the PRR until much of its Maryland trackage was washed out by Hurricane Agnes in 1972; after which most of its operations ceased as the Penn Central declined to repair sections.

Road Numbers AAR Description 12/1897 10/1900 10/1907 9/1954
1-250   25 Ton Hopper Gondola 200 108 0 0
200-249 HM 50 Ton Steel Gondola 0 0 47 1
(#202)
251-2650   30 Ton Wood Hopper Gondola 2,400 2,400 1,633 0
2651-3150 GN 40 Ton Wood Hopper Gondola 0 500 491 0
2656, 2670, 2830, 2904, 2952, 3048, 3061, 3069, 3097   50 Ton Steel Gondola 0 0 9 0
3151-3250   50 Ton Steel Gondola 0 0 100 0
3251-3750 HM 50 Ton Steel Gondola, ACF/PSC 0 0 500 62
3752-3811 GB 50 Ton Steel Gondola 46', G22. Built in 1918 to Pennsy standards with drop bottom doors. Rebuilt in the late 1920s with a tight floor, running to abandonement of the railroad in March 1954. 0 0 0 7
Number Comments
FREIGHT ROSTER
501 Box car
PASSENGER ROSTER
3 Combine
4 Coach
7 Combine. Converted from a baggage car at Coleville.
15 Combine. Converted from a baggage car at Coleville.
100 (1st) Steam Powered Combine
100 (2nd) Gas Powered Coach
NON-REVENUE ROSTER
100 Plow Russell snow plow.
101 Caboose (photo in 1953)
102 Caboose (photo in 1947) Ex-Army staff car.
103 Caboose (photo in 1955) Evans Autorailer.

 

Number Type Years Comments
1 4-6-0 1892 - 1902 Baldwin 1886, acquired 1892 from BRB&BE, sold 1902 to Pittsburgh Construction Co.
2 4-6-0 1892 - 1903 Baldwin 18??, ex-PRR class G1, acq. 1892, sold 1903.
3 4-6-0 1893 - 1902 Baldwin 1873 ex-PRR class G1 No. 836, acq. 1893, sold 1902 to Huntingdon and Broad Top Mountain Railroad.
4 2-8-0 1902 - 1912 Altoona? 1883, ex-PRR class H1, acq. 1902, sold 1912 to Brownsville Construction Co.
5 4-4-0 1902 - 1920 Altoona 1886, ex-PRR class D7a No. 1015, acq. 1902, sold 1920 to Kishacoquillas Valley RR.
6 2-8-0 1903 - 1910 Altoona? 1882, ex-PRR class H1, acq. 1903, sold 1910.
7 4-4-0 1904 - 1905 ????, acq. 1904, exchanged for No. 8, 1905.
8 4-4-0 1905 - 1912 Baldwin 1883, ex-Richmond Fredericksburg & Potomac, acq. 1905, sold 1912.
9 2-8-0 1910 - 1936 Altoona 1888, ex-PRR class H3 No. 4159, acq. 1910, scrapped 1936.
10 2-8-0 1910 - 1928 Altoona 1889, ex-PRR class H3 No. 1759, acq. 1910, retired 1926, scrapped 1928.
11 2-8-0 1912 - 1928 Altoona 1891, ex-PRR class H3 No. 196, acq. 1912, scrapped 1928.
12 4-6-0 1920 - 1921 ????. acq. 1920, sold 1921 to Louisiana & Northwestern.
13 2-8-0 1923 - 1930 Altoona 1888, ex-PRR class H3 No. 4158, acq. 1923, sold for scrap 1930.
14 2-8-0 1928 - 1931 Alco/Brooks, ??, ex-Pittsburgh Lisbon & Western No. 18 (?), acq. 1928, sold for scrap 1931.
15 2-8-0 1929 - 1940 Baldwin 1905, ex Lehigh & New England No. 18, acq. 1929, sold 1940 to C&PA RR.
16 2-8-0 1930 - 1940 Alco/R. I. 1902, ex-Detroit Toledo & Ironton No. 76, acq. 1930, sold 1940 to M&U RR.
17 2-8-0 1930 - 1947 Alco/R. I. 1902, ex-Detroit Toledo & Ironton No. 77, acq. 1930, scrapped 1947.
18 2-8-0 1938 - 1947 Richmond 1909, ex-C&O, ex-Va. Central No. 1022, acquired from dealer 1938, scrapped 1947.
19 2-8-0 1940 - 1949 Richmond 1906, ex-C&O, ex-Va. Central No. 901, acquired from dealer 1940, scrapped 1949.
20 2-8-0 1946 - 1953 Juniata,1913, ex-PRR class H9s No. 3485, purchased from PRR 1946, scrapped 1953.
21 2-8-0 1947 - 1953 Juniata 1908, ex-PRR class H9s No. 1691, purchased from PRR 1947, scrapped 1953.
22 2-8-0 1949 - 1956 Baldwin, ex-PRR class H9s No. 444, purchased from PRR 1949, scrapped 1956.
5323 SW9 1953 - 1979 Purchased 1953 new from EMD, off roster 1979, to South Central Tennessee RR.
5624 SW1200 1956 - 1985 Purchased 1956 new from EMD, off roster 1985, to South Central Tennessee RR.
Signal charts are similar to track charts in that they are linear records of segments of the railroad. However, they show where signal heads are located and what aspects they are capable of showing.

Track charts are linear records of segments of the railroad. They are "to scale". Although the schematic is linear, at the bottom of the chart is a depiction of the degree of curvature of the line, as well as grades.
 
Signal charts are very similar, but show where signal heads are located and what aspects they are capable of showing.

IMG_2543.jpgOver the years, I have had the opportunity to operate on many fine model railroads, including...

 

The Bucket List

If the stars were to align, I would love to operate on the following layouts...

ALTO CTC machine right

Union Switch & Signal (US&S) was a primary supplier of control systems to the Pennsylvania Railroad. Their compact, desktop series of CTC machines were labeled the 500 series. What follows is a discussion of what is seen on these machines and how they differed from location to location.