On Location Series

The On Location series takes a deep dive into a Pennsylvania Railroad location as indicated within the CT1000 - List of Stations and Sidings.

mt rock mill

Heritage: Mifflin & Centre County Railroad

CT 1000, 1945: Eastern Region, Eastern Pennsylvania Division, Middle Division, Milroy Branch

Middle Division ETT, 1954: Eastern Region, Middle Division, Milroy Secondary

The locals refer to this area as "Mount Rock". This is the area where the McDonald's restaurant is today on Electric Avenue. 

lewistown 1950

Heritage: Mifflin & Centre County Railroad

CT 1000, 1945: Eastern Region, Eastern Pennsylvania Division, Middle Division

Middle Division ETT, 1954: Eastern Region, Middle Division, Lewistown Secondary

The LN destination is comprised of the Lewistown Secondary, Furnace Branch Siding, and the Milroy Secondary.

Where street addresses are indicated, the years in parenthesis indicate first and last years confirmed in street directories. Entites could have been at the address before and after these dates.

IMG 1946

Heritage: Mifflin & Centre County Railroad

CT 1000, 1945: Eastern Region, Eastern Pennsylvania Division, Middle Division

Middle Division ETT, 1954: Eastern Region, Middle Division, Lewistown Secondary

The LN destination is comprised of the Lewistown Secondary, Furnace Branch Siding, and the Milroy Secondary.

Where street addresses are indicated, the years in parenthesis indicate first and last years confirmed in street directories. Entites could have been at the address before and after these dates.

reesville undated

 Heritage: Mifflin & Centre County Railroad

CT 1000, 1945: Eastern Region, Eastern Pennsylvania Division, Middle Division, Milroy Branch

Middle Division ETT, 1954: Eastern Region, Middle Division, Milroy Secondary

1917 naginey shelter

Heritage: Mifflin & Centre County Railroad

CT 1000, 1945: Eastern Region, Eastern Pennsylvania Division, Middle Division, Milroy Branch

Middle Division ETT, 1954: Eastern Region, Middle Division, Milroy Secondary

Naginey was named for Charles Naginey and is the site of a vast limestone quarry.

Middleburg station

The 1884 Form 76 lists Middleburg. Simonton Barber & Co. (Loc 1584) and Harriet Dunkelberger (Loc 1585) are listed separately.

The 1900 CT1000 lists W. B. Winey (MP 33.0) and J. M. & G. H. Steininger (MP 33.0).

The 1923 CT1000 lists a Station (MP 33.0), W. B. Winey (MP 33.1), J. M. & G. H. Steininger (MP 33.1), J. Paskus & Son, Inc. (MP 33.4), Passing Siding (MP 33.5), and Supplee-Wills-Jones Milk Co. (MP 33.5).

The 1945 CT1000 lists a Station (MP 33.0), W. B. Winey (MP 33.1), Middleburg Tanning (MP 33.4), Storage (MP 33.4), and Dairyman's League Co-operative Ass'n., Inc. No. 2 (MP 33.5), and M. C. Romberger, Inc. (MP 33.5).

The only entry in the CT1000 in 1945 is for the York Water Co., and the town is not identified. The 1923 CT1000 shows the location as Brilhart with a Station (551) and York Water Co. No. 2 (552).

Howard Tunnel 1870s

Howard Tunnel in the 1870s.

Howard Tunnel was built in 1838 as a single track bore. During the Civil War, because of the immense increase in wartime traffic, the Northern Central was double-tracked, with the exception of Howard Tunnel, in 1863. In 1869, with traffic returned to normal, the Northern Central opened up the tunnel for two tracks with a brick lining and stone portals. Due to a large decrease in passenger traffic the Northern Central was single-tracked again in the late 1950s. So that newly instituted TrucTrain traffic between Washington, Baltomore and Harrisburg (trains TT-5 and TT-8) had clearance through the tunnel, the single track was moved more towards the center under the highest point of the arch. The grade was also under cut to add more clearance, and this can be seen on the east wall of the tunnel where the brick arch stops and there is about two feet of rock exposed down to the current grade. (Ivan Frantz)

Valuation Maps

PRR.NC.v2.PA 016 1924 MP51 Howard Tunnel M001357

PRR.NC.v2.PA-016_1924_MP51_-_Howard_Tunnel (PRRT&HS)

PRR.NC.v2.PA 016 1948 MP51 Howard Tunnel M011163

PRR.NC.v2.PA-016_1948_MP51_-_Howard_Tunnel (PRRT&HS)

 

The Northern Central rented space for a ticket office in a two story general store at this location. This building still stands on the east side of the tracks. (Ivan Frantz)

smyser

The station called Smyser was in the town of Seven Valleys.

The station was called Smyser because that was the name of the man who built what would become the station. It was originally a general store in which the railroad leased space for a ticket office. There was an early ice cream maker in the town that would ship his product to Baltimore by train. Today the former station is an antique shop. (Ivan Frantz)

Authorized passenger train speed on the Northern Central was 55 m.p.h. Of course, there were speed restrictions for curvesm going through towns, etc. Dippers Curve was one of the sharpest curves on the line and had a speed restriction of 30 m.p.h., even with the curve being super-elevated like the rest of the curves on the Northern Central. Supposedly the curve got its name because in the summers when school was not in session, passengers on the passing trains could look out at the Codorus Creek which was very close to the railroad, and see kids "skinny dipping" in the creek on hot summer days. (Ivan Frantz)