Track Segment Series

The Track Segment series documents track segments as indicated in the CT1000 of 1945 in conjunction with the Employee Timetables of 1954. Where available, locations indicated may link to a corresponding On Location series article for more detailed information.

Track Guide

The following is a tour of the Columbia Branch, based on the 1945 edition of the Pennsylvania Railroad CT1000 -- List of Stations and Sidings.

Click on the link of a location for more information (if available).

LocationName
154  Dillerville, Pa.  Junc. Philadelphia Division - Main Line 
154A  
154C    Star Independent Oil Co.
154B    Lancaster Brick Co.
155  Rohrerstown, Pa.  
158  Mountville, Pa.  
160  
161  Glen Manor, Pa.  
163  Columbia, Pa.  Junc. R. & C. Branch - Reading Co.
 Junc. Maryland Division - York Branch 
164  Chickies, Pa.  
167  Watts, Pa.  
168  Marietta, Pa.  
169  Shock's Mills, Pa.  Junc. Philadelphia Division - Atglen & Susquehanna Branch 
170  Marietta Storage Yard - West Connection
171  
172  Billmyer, Pa.  
174  
175  Bainbridge, Pa.  
178  Collins, Pa.  
   Falmouth, Pa.  
3199  Royalton, Pa.   Junc. Philadelphia Division - Main Line 

Track Guide

The following is a tour of the Maryland Division - York, Hanover & Frederick Railway, based on the 1945 edition of the Pennsylvania Railroad CT1000 -- List of Stations and Sidings.

Click on the link of a location for more information (if available).

LocationName
Y  York, Pa.  Junc. Maryland Division - Northern Central Railway 
WY  West York, Pa.   Junc. Western Maryland Ry.
3718  Graybill, Pa.  
3720  Bair, Pa.  
3723  Spring Grove, Pa.  
HR  Hanover, Pa.  
3735    Hanover & McSherrystown Water Co.
3736  Sell, Pa.  
3739  Littlestown, Pa.  
3741  Kingsdale, Pa.  
     Penna.-Maryland State Line
3744  Galt, Md.  
3747  Taneytown, Md.  
 KM  Keymar, Md.  Junc. Union Bridge Branch
3754  Ladiesburg, Md.  
3756  New Midway, Md.  
3757  Le Gore, Md.  
3758  Woodsboro, Md.  
3763  Walkersville, Md.  
3764  Fountain Rock, Md.   
3766  Harmony Grove, Md.   
FR  Frederick, Md.  Junc. B. & O. R. R.

Track Guide

The following is a tour of the Maryland Division - York Branch, based on the 1945 edition of the Pennsylvania Railroad CT1000 -- List of Stations and Sidings.

Click on the link of a location for more information (if available).

LocationName
163  Columbia, Pa.  Junc. Philadelphia Division 
WV  Wrightsville, Pa.  
3702    Ewing Passing Siding
3703  Strickler, Pa.  
3706   Hellam, Pa.  
3707    CAMPBELL Block Limit Station 
3708    Ira K. Newcomer
3712  Rockburn, Pa.  
3713  York, Pa.  
Y  Junc. Maryland Division - Northern Central Railway 

The Sang Hollow Extension was an extension of the Conemaugh Division Main Line eastward from Conpitt Junction to Johnstown, Pa. Despite being an extension of the Conemaugh Division, it was operated by the Pittsburgh Division, largely due to the typical traffic pattern coming out of Johnstown which was both tracks westward.

Track Guide

The following is a tour of the Waynesboro Branch based on the 1945 edition of the Pennsylvania Railroad CT1000 -- List of Stations and Sidings.

Click on the link of a location for more information (if available).

LocationName
G50   Chambersburg, Pa.  Junc. Philadelphia Division - Cumberland Valley Branch
GA52  Burgner, Pa.  
   Brookside, Pa.  
GA 54   Woodstock, Pa.  
GA56  Fayetteville, Pa.  
GA57  East Fayetteville, Pa.  
GA60

 Pond Bank, Pa.

 
GA61 Ledy, Pa.  Conn. to Mont Alto Park Siding
GA62  Mont Alto, Pa.  
GA63  Knepper, Pa.  
GA64  Good, Pa.  
GA65  Quincy, Pa.  
GA65A  Orphanage, Pa.  
GA66  Nunnerym, Pa.  
GA68  Waynesboro, Pa.  

Elmira Station

For a minimal distance, the Pennsylvania Railroad's Elmira Branch used trackage rights through Elmira, N.Y., on the Erie Railroad.

The Sunbury and Lewistown Railroad was a Class I Railroad connecting Lewistown, Pennsylvania with Sunbury, Pennsylvania. Completed in December 1871, the line was placed under an immediate lease by the Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR), upon its completion. Although retaining its own board of directors and track maintenance, all locomotive traffic was owned by the PRR. For over eighty years, the line operated between Sunbury and Lewistown, serving as a relief line for both the Pennsylvania Main Line and Bald Eagle Valley Railroad through Williamsport, Pennsylvania. The line was noteworthy as a proving ground for new railroad technology in the United States, such as the "X"-shaped railroad crossing signs in 1917 (now nearly ubiquitous in the United States) and Pulse Code Cab Signaling technology in 1925. It is now a fallen flag railway, the name "Sunbury and Lewistown" having been phased out in 1901 when the line became part of the Pennsylvania Railroad's Sunbury Division. (Wikipedia)

The Bellefonte and Snow Shoe Railroad was a coal-hauling railroad in Centre County, Pennsylvania. Begun in 1859, it came under the control of the Pennsylvania Railroad in 1881. Closing of mines in the 1930s resulted in the decline of traffic on the railroad, which was abandoned in 1959.

Origins and Construction

The line was originally chartered as the Allegheny and Bald Eagle Railroad, Coal and Iron Company on June 12, 1839. It was to extend from the western side of the Allegheny Mountains to Bald Eagle Creek. For many years, however, it showed no organized activity, although the Pennsylvania General Assembly periodically renewed its charter. On May 2, 1855, a charter supplement allowed it to extend to Bellefonte, to connect with the Bald Eagle and Spring Creek Navigation canal. In 1857, a survey of the line was finally completed. Construction began in 1858, and it was completed in 1859, from the coal mines at Snow Shoe to Snow Shoe Intersection (now Wingate) in the Bald Eagle Valley. There it connected with the west end of the newly constructed Tyrone and Lock Haven Railroad, which ran up the valley to Milesburg and then south to Bellefonte, and over which it had trackage rights.

The Atglen and Susquehanna Branch is an abandoned branch line of the Pennsylvania Railroad. The line ran from Lemoyne to Atglen, Pennsylvania.

History

The Atglen and Susquehanna (A&S) Branch was built by the Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR) between 1902 and 1906. The branch was built to relieve congestion on the Philadelphia to Harrisburg Main Line and the railroad's Columbia & Port Deposit (C&PD) line. It was designed for freight service, and minimizing the grade profile was of high importance, since freight service on the main line was hampered by relatively steep grade profiles. Thus the branch was often known simply as the "Low Grade."