The Pennsy Modeler

In order to portray Pennsylvania Railroad and interchange partners as accurately as possible, this blog contains articles which are essentially notes to myself, but are shared should the community desire the same information.

Articles are sorted by modification date, so if an existing article receives an update it will be presented at the top of the list again.

As of 1923 (interpreted from Form CT1000), the Pennsylvania Railroad was organized into Regions, Divisions, and Railroads. Railroads represented in bold are included in the listings but are believed to be independent railroads (many are confirmed so).

Central Region data courtesy of Robert Netzlof. (Anyone have the Western Region?)

view 1

The Pennsylvania Railroad had operated a specially designed car constructed on a flat car. It's purpose was to accurately measure the distance above and/or adjacent to the tracks of bridges, tunnels, stations and rock cuts, etc.

The demaind for increased speed to shorten travel time in both present day industry and the business world has caused the railroad to provide more clearance for movement of equipment. The trend to larger equipment such as locomotives, passenger & freight cars and larger loads in open top cars has made the gathering of clearance information an area of growing importance. The Pennsylvania has spent millions of dollars to increase clerances for handling traffic. In the 1950s alone, the Panhandle Division tunnel project between Pittsburgh, Pa., and Dennision, Oh., cost over $8 million.

 AMB 141 2 09543.1504129027

Station Location HO Scale Model  
Centre Hall, Pa. Branchline centre hall
New Freedom, Pa. American Model Builders #AMB-141  newfreedom
North Philadelphia, Pa. DESIGNDYNE on Shapeways  
Perryville, Md. DESIGNDYNE on Shapeways perryville
Spring City, Pa. Scientific Models #60482 spring city
Wilmington, De. Trainstuff (defunct)
DESIGNDYNE on Shapeways
 

RAILC X 40b 3w

Over the years, many lettering "schemes" have graced the sides of the Pennsy's vast fleet of rolling stock used in freight revenue service. This is a brief summary of an article by Brady McGuire which originally appeared in the Summer 1988 (Vol.21 No.2) issue of The Keystone, published by the Pennsylvania Railroad Technical & Historical Society. I highly recommend referring to the original text which contained much more information, prototype photos as examples, and official painting and lettering diagrams.

For modeling purposes, please remember that a particular scheme could be seen well after the period indicated below for the scheme. The period indicated represents what scheme would be applied to a car if painted during the period in question. But many cars, especially gondolas, were rarely repainted. For instance, a Circle Keystone gondola might be seen well into the 1960s...or even today!

Lettering banners and slogans were periodic modifications to lettering schemes which were not tied to a specific scheme but rather to a type of service or concept. For example, "Merchandise Service" or "Buy War Bonds".

299x132 2D F8

 

Interpretation of Truck Classification
SymbolRefers to
First Number of axles per truck
Second A.A.R. Class letter for journal dia. only (see below)
Third Dash-for standard A.A.R. axle
number-for numerical deviation from A.A.R. standard
Fourth Service of truck. F=Freight, P=Passenger, T=Tender
Fifth Consecutive design of truck for class
Sixth Modification to truck design
A.A.R. ClassABCDEF
Journal size (in.) 3-3/4x7 4-1/4x8 5x9 5-1/2x10 6x11 6-1/2x12
Capy. per axle 15000 24000 32000 40000 50000 60000

 

 

divisions41 68

By Ed Spodobalski

[This article is presented in its entirety as it appeared in the December 1978 issue of Rails Northeast. No attempt is being made to present it here as original work. We have no means of contacting the original author, though the original publisher has indicated no offense in republication. We hope that the author would approve of its republication here and we are prepared to remove it if requested to do so. Also note that the content of the article is one of reporting simple facts as determined from actual PRR publications and it does not contain conjecture or personal opinion on the part of the author. Therefore, any researcher could arrive at the same data fairly readily.]

enola

The information presented following was cumulated from the January 1955 edition of the ORER (Official Railroad Equipment Register). The data pages for the Pennsylvania Railroad indicate that the data is current as of October 1, 1954.

Subclasses are tallied separately, with the exception of H21a, H21b, and H21e hopper cars which which were listed in different combinations, but combined here as "H21a & variants".

The list only takes into account equipment available for interchange, so does not include miscellaneous and maintenance of way equipment. 

The referenced HO scale models are listed based on how the cars are lettered... not what they best represent. Some cars show comments as to their appropriateness, while cars that have not been evaluated are followed by a "(?)". "(OOB)" indicates that the manufacturer is out of business.

My compilation shows a total fleet of 183,689 cars available for interchange, broken out by Box, Gondola, Stock, Coke, Hopper, and Flat car types.

 60388ab9 58ee 4d72 9e5a 53e3bd3f43cb

The paint scheme on the Pennsy's passenger diesels changed over time. Bob Johnson, Chairman of the PRRT&HS Archive Committee, provided the following summary from documents found within the archives of the PRRT&HS:

Before 8-11-1952 - Dark Green with Gold Leaf lettering and striping. Five stripes. (photo above)

mo tower

The following table lists HO scale models of Pennsylvania Railroad towers that have been produced. Not all models indicated are readily available.

creco door8203Large

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The first all-metal door to gain general acceptance was launched in 1910 by the Chicago Railway Equipment Corporation (Creco), a major supplier of other accoutrements to car builders. Creco three-panel steel doors were used on Pennsylvania Railroad’s X23 boxcars built in 1912 but acceptance of Creco doors remained limited. Things changed in 1923 when the three-panel bottom-supported Creco doors was applied to many PRR X29 boxcars. Variations of the Creco door continued in use into the 1940s.

 

 

 

d161 pfe92157

Pacific Fruit Express (reporting mark PFE) was an American railroad refrigerator car leasing company that at one point was the largest refrigerator car operator in the world.

The company was founded on December 7, 1906 as a joint venture between the Union Pacific and Southern Pacific railroads. It began operation on October 1, 1907, with a fleet of 6,600 refrigerator cars built by the American Car and Foundry Company (ACF). The company was founded on December 7, 1906 as a joint venture between the Union Pacific and Southern Pacific railroads. It began operation on October 1, 1907, with a fleet of 6,600 refrigerator cars built by the American Car and Foundry Company (ACF).