Timeline:

  • 1977: SP/Sea-Land well car begins testing.
  • 1981: First SP double-stacks enter service.
  • 1983: First Budd/Thrall well cars without bulkheads delivered.
  • 1999: First production 53-foot well cars are delivered.
  • 2003: TTX begins program for shortening 45- and 48-foot wells.
  • 2010: TTX roster almost entirely 40- or 53-foot well platforms.

Notes:

  • Thrall merged with Trinity in 2001. Thereafter, Thrall designs were marketed through Trinity Rail Group.
  • Gunderson is owned by Greenbrier.
  • All TTX well cars carry the reporting marks DTTX.

 

TTX Double-Stack Fleet As-Built
Model Well
Configuration
Qty TTX Class Notes Years Active HO Scale Model
Thrall Car Manufacturing
100-ton Articulated Cars:
Lo-Pac 2000  40' 40' 40' 40' 40' 296

 TWG5M
TWG50
TWG50A
TWG50B
TWG50C
TWG50H
TWG5BM
TWG51
TWG53

Capable of carrying 48' containers in the top positions. Design licensed from Budd. 1988- InterMountain
  40' 45' 48' 45' 40' 1 TWG50P       
  40' 45' 45' 45' 40' 25 TWG50F    1988-   
  40' 48' 48' 48' 40' 408 TWG50G
TWG50K
TWG50L
     
  45' 45' 45' 45' 45' 23 TWG50D
TWG50J 
  1986-   
  48' 48' 48' 48' 48' 40 TWG50E    1989-   
125-ton Articulated Cars:
  40' 48' 48' 48' 40' 292  TWG52       
  48' 48' 48' 48' 48' 1,381 TWG52A
TWG52B
TWG52C 
     
  53' 53' 53' 53' 53' 1  TWG53P      
  53' 53' 53' 751 TWG33P
TWG33
    Atlas
728688
Single-Unit COFC-only Cars:
Well Runner 48' 962  TWF10
TWF10A
TWH10
TWH10P
     
Drawbar-Connected COFC-only Cars:
  48' 48' 48' 300  TWG30   1991-   
  48' 48' 48' 48' 138  TWG40   1991-   
Single-Unit All Purpose Cars:
  48' 150  TWA10      
Drawbar-Connected All-Purpose Cars:
  48' 48' 48' 116  TWA30      
Gunderson
100-ton Articulated Cars:
Twin-Stack 40' 40' 40' 40' 40' 343 GWG50
GWG50A
GWG50B
GWG50C
GWG50D
GWG50E
GWG50F
GWG50G
GWG50H
GWG50J
End bulkheads to retain upper containers.   InterMountain 
125-ton Articulated Cars:
 Maxi-Stack I 40' 40' 40' 40' 40' 3,214 GWG52
GWG52D
GWG52E
GWG52G
GWG52H
GWG52I
     Athearn
  40' 48' 48' 48' 40' 43 GWG52A       
Maxi-Stack III  48' 48' 48' 48' 48' 2,496 GWG52B
GWG52C
GWG52F
    Athearn
Maxi-Stack V  53' 53' 53' 53' 53' 1 GWG53P       
Maxi-Stack IV  53' 53' 53' 7,680 GWG33
GWG33A
GWG33B
GWG33C
GWG33D
GWG33E
GWG33P 
    InterMountain
Kato 
766519
Single-Unit COFC-only Cars:
Husky Stack  48' 875 GWF10     1991- Athearn
InterMountain
Husky Stack   53' 2,130  GWF13   2003-  Rapido 
  56' 101  GWF11      
Drawbar-Connected COFC-only Cars:
  48' 48' 48' 48' 60 GWG40       
Single-Unit All Purpose Cars:
Husky Stack AP  48' 947 GWA10       
Drawbar-Connected All-Purpose Cars:
  48' 48' 48' 873 GWA30       
  48' 48' 48' 48' 200 GWA40       
Pullman Standard / Trinity Industries
100-ton Articulated Cars:
BackPacker  40' 40' 40' 40' 40' 71 RWG50
RWG50A
RWG50B
RWG50C
RWG50P 
   1986- ScaleTrains
125-ton Articulated Cars:
  40' 40' 40' 40' 40' 5 RWG52A      
  40' 48' 48' 48' 40' 117 RWG52    1987-   
Backpacker  48' 48' 48' 48' 48' 116 RWG52B
RWG52C
RWG53 
  1990-   
  53' 53' 53' 53' 53' 1        
  53' 53' 53' 1,236 RWG33
RWG33A
     
Single-Unit COFC-only Cars:
Well Runner  48' 1 RWH10P       
Drawbar-Connected COFC-only Cars:
  53' 53' 53' 160  RWG30      
Single-Unit All Purpose Cars:
  48' 10 RWA10       
National Steel Car (NSC)
125-ton Articulated Cars:
  40' 40' 40' 40' 40' 310  NWG52
NWG52A
     
  48' 48' 48' 286  NWA33      
Super Stack 53' 53' 53' 53' 53' 1        
  53' 53' 53' 5,428 NWG33A
NWG33B
NWG33C
NWG33D
NWG33E
NWG33F
NWG33P
     
Single-Unit COFC-only Cars:
  53' 6,190 NWF13
NWF13A
    Walthers
Drawbar-Connected COFC-only Cars:
  48' 48' 48' 744  NWG31   1998-   
  53' 53' 53' 1,022  NWG33      
Drawbar-Connected All-Purpose Cars:
  48' 48' 48' 80 NWA31    1995 Walthers
  48' 48' 48' 48' 120  NWA40      
Freight Car America
125-ton Articulated Cars:
Dynastack 40' 40' 40' 40' 40' 50 NWG52L    2008-  
  53' 53' 53' 100 NWG30      Walthers 
Single-Unit COFC-only Cars:
   53'  1        
Unidentified Builder
  40' 40' 40' 40' 40' 50 JWG52   2013-  
  53' 53' 53'   JWG33   2016-  

TTX Double-Stack Rebuilds

Articulated Cars or Drawbar-Connected COFC-only Cars:
  40' 40' 40' 40' 40  

TWG51P
TW52BM
TW52CM
TW52N
TW52AN
TW52BN
TW52CN

    Walthers
748410
  40' 40' 40' 40' 40   GW52AM
GW52BM
GW52CM
GW52FM
     Walthers
  40' 40' 40' 40' 40'   RW52M
RW52BM
RW52CM
RW53M
  1988-  
  40' 40' 40' 40' 40'   NWG32M      
  40' 48' 48' 48' 40'   TWG50K
TWG52
  1987  
  48' 48' 48' 1 TWG32C   1992  
Single-Unit COFC-only Cars:
  40'   TWF10F
TWF10M
TWF10N
  1991- Walthers
  40'   GWF10F
GWF10M
  1991-  
  40'   NWF10F
NWF11F
  1994-  
  53'   GW13SF
GWF13S
  1994- Walthers
  53'   NWF13
NW13SF
NW14SF
  1993-  
Single-Unit All Purpose Cars:
  48'   GWA10   1994- Atlas
Walthers
456164

 

tofc greer shutterstock1113286211 1

If I wasn't modeling the Pennsy, I'd be modeling modern intermodal...

440px TTX Company 2008 LogoTTX was founded in 1955 by the Norfolk & Western Railway, Pennsylvania Railroad and Rail-Trailer Corporation. Pennsylvania Railroad employees - 6,000 in total - entered possible names in a drawing for the new company, and the name "Trailer Train" won. TrailerTrain's original goals were to standardize TOFC railcar practices, foster the growth of transportation, provide its members with the best available equipment at the lowest cost, and keep its members abreast of new developments. In 1991, the company changed its company name from TrailerTrain to TTX.

   

 

P1010561 Former coal yard on the right. There was once a siding here. P1010562
P1010566 P1010567
P1010568 P1010571
P1010572 P1010564
P1010565 P1010563
P1010569 P1010570
P1010573 Looking westward from the Atlantic Refining site. P1010574 Looking eastward from the Atlantic Refining site, which would have been on the left where the church is now.
P1010575 Former Supplee building. P1010576
P1010577 P1010580 Looking westward across Bridge 0.51.
P1010581 View eastward. P1010578
P1010579 P1010582
P1010583 Next view westward. P1010584 View eastward.
P1010585 Unknown what came across these piers!  

 

1022.1241838398 1956 h10s 7558
1956 h10s ready 1956 i1s 4233
1956 m1a 6769 1957 lewistown ready
H9 2857 ltwnjpg I1 4249 2369 Lewistown
ltwnalcoRH M1 6811 Lewistown 1956
Pennsylvania Railroad engine 1770 an H 9S 2 8 0 Consolidated in Lewistown Mifflin County on August 29 1953jpg PRR6744LewistownPA123156gf
Four locomotives identified -- but not confirmed -- as being in Lewistown:

Lewistown H9s 1051

H9s 1051.

Lewistown H9s 2859

H9s 2859

Lewistown H9s 2887

H9s 2887

Lewistown M1 6932

M1 6932

   
IMG 1434 Buildings behind station and along secondary. IMG 1435
IMG 1648 IMG 1649
IMG 1650 IMG 1651
IMG 1652 IMG 1653
IMG 1654 IMG 1656
IMG 1658 P1010430
P1010431 P1010432
P1010433 P1010434
P1010435 P1010436
P1010437 P1010438
P1010439 P1010440
P1010441 P1010442
P1010443 P1010444
P1010445 P1010449
P1010450 P1010451
P1010452 P1010453
P1010454 Former Viscose site. P1010455
P1010456 P1010457
P1010458 P1010459
P1010460 P1010461
P1010462 P1010463
P1010464 P1010467
P1010465 Meanwhile, back in the yard... the turntable is still in place. You can see the arch in the distance. P1010466
P1010468 P1010469
P1010470 P1010471
P1010472 P1010473
   
   
   
   

 

Amtrak Auto Train

After a period of 22 months without service, the service was revived by Amtrak, which operates most intercity passenger trains in the United States. Amtrak acquired the terminals in Lorton and Sanford and some of the Auto Train equipment. On October 30, 1983, it introduced its new version of the service (under the slightly modified name "Auto Train") on a triweekly basis. Daily service was introduced a year later.

H BT Huntingdon Broad Top Railraod Locomotive Coal Car in Saxton Bedford County in 1953jpg

Huntingdon & Broad Top Mountain Railroad (H&BTM) (reporting mark HBTM) is a former short line railroad company operating passenger and freight service on standard gauge track in south central Pennsylvania.

Operational headquarters were in Huntingdon, and Saxton, with financial and business offices located in Philadelphia. The primary shop facilities were located in Saxton; auxiliary car shop facilities were at Huntington. Turntables were located at Huntingdon, Saxton, and Mount Dallas, Pennsylvania.

 bellefontecentral

The Bellefonte Central Railroad (reporting mark BFC) was a shortline connecting Bellefonte and State College, Pennsylvania. Constructed in the late 19th century to haul local iron ore to furnaces in the Bellefonte region, it later hauled freight traffic to Penn State and lime for steelmaking from local quarries. The line to State College was abandoned in 1974, and most of the remaining railroad in 1984, but a small portion is still used by the Nittany and Bald Eagle Railroad.

emd fp7 f7b loksound 5 sound and dcc 920 42512 big

Amtrak logo 2Another collection of notes unrelated to the Pennsy... but hey, it's my web site!

The National Railroad Passenger Corporation, doing business as Amtrak (reporting marks AMTK, AMTZ), is a passenger railroad service that provides medium and long-distance intercity service in the contiguous United States and to nine Canadian cities.

Founded in 1971 as a quasi-public corporation to operate many U.S. passenger rail services, it receives a combination of state and federal subsidies but is managed as a for-profit organization. Amtrak's headquarters is located one block west of Union Station in Washington, D.C.

75BD6READFGUDDS44J43BBCRPYThe Freedom Train and the Friendship train sit side-by-side in Harrisburg on Nov. 17, 1947.
The Friendship Train has a sign that says, "Food for friends" in English, French and Italian.

‘Two of the greatest post-war symbols of democracy in action’ in Harrisburg in 1947

49712a left side wl

500px Nsheadlogo.svgThe system began in 1982 with the creation of the Norfolk Southern Corporation, a holding company for the Southern Railway (SOU, formed in 1894) and Norfolk & Western Railway (N&W, formed in 1881). In 1990, the two systems merged and formed the Norfolk Southern Railway.

The system grew with the acquisition of over half of Conrail. In 1996, CSX bid to buy Conrail; Norfolk Southern, fearing that CSX would come to dominate rail traffic in the eastern U.S., responded with a bid of its own. On June 23, 1997, NS and CSX filed a joint application with the Surface Transportation Board (STB) for authority to purchase, divide, and operate the assets of Conrail. On June 6, 1998, the STB approved the NS-CSX application, effective August 22, 1998. NS acquired 58% of Conrail assets, while CSX got the remaining 42%, including about 7,200 miles (11,600 km) of track, most of which was part of the former Pennsylvania Railroad. NS began operating its trains on its portion of the former Conrail network on June 1, 1999, closing out the 1990s merger era. The Consolidated Rail Corporation (Conrail) was a 11,000-mile (18,000 km) system formed in 1976 from the Penn Central Railroad (1968–1976), by bringing together several ailing northeastern railway systems into a government-owned corporation. Conrail was perhaps the most controversial conglomerate in corporate history. Penn Central itself was created by merging three venerable rivals — the Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR, 1846), the New York Central Railroad (NYC, 1831), and the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad (NYNH&H, 1872) — as well as some smaller competitors. In 1980, Conrail had become profitable after the Staggers Act largely deregulated the U.S. railroad industry.