Research Blog

In my pursuit of modeling the Pennsylvania Railroad and Lewistown with historical accuracy, articles in this blog will address specific topics.

Your contributions and insights are not only welcome, but appreciated!

Articles are sorted by modification date, so if an existing article receives an update it will be presented at the top of the list again.

reesville undated

 

A photograph of a water tower at this location is on page 117 of Lewistown and the Pennsyvania Railroad (PRRT&HS).

Junc. Kishacoquillas Valley R. R. No. 1

Listed in 1923 CT1000.

Not listed in 1945 CT1000. The KVRR ceased operations in 1941. 

applause-clipart-applause.jpgThere are a number of folks that I would like to thank for providing me with answers to my research, source material, photographs,etc.

Rich Ader - Lewistown resident who knows the people I need to know!

Michael Bezilla - Author; Bellefonte Central R. R. historian.

Dan Cupper - Author; grew up in Lewistown.

Paul Fagley - Author “Memories of Kishocoquillas Park”; authority on Mann Axe and other industries.

I am seeking information on the following topics relevant to my modeling...

OPERATIONS

Main Line Operations

Hawstone Refractories -- The brickyard was serviced via a trailing point switch off of track one at Hawstone. A local out of Lewistown serviced industries from Lewistown through Newport. If a local were to head east out of the Lewistown yard, it could cross over as far as track two, but not to track one. There was no opportunity to cross all the way over to track one until WALL interlocking, which was well past Hawstone. I see two possiblities:

1) The local backed westward out of the yard, through LEWIS interlocking, across to track one, then proceeded eastward.

2) The local did not service Hawstone Refractories and it was instead serviced by a through train between Altoona and Enola.

Standby Power -- Lewistown maintained numerous locomotives as stand-by power to protect main line trains. Not only were these locomotives photographed around the Lewistown Junction yard, but employee time books indicate they ran light and were staged along the main line, both eastward and westward. Where were they staged? There were no turning facilities eastward, and westward there was a turntable at Mt. Union, but it was too small to handle M1's, which were typical for standby power.

Lewistown Secondary Operations

With the discontinuation of passenger traffic in 1941, the branch was reduced to secondary status. There were no signals or cab signals. Crews contacted LEWIS tower for permissions. That said, were Form 19/31's still transcribed, or was the permission simply verbal?

Milroy Secondary Operations

With the discontinuation of passenger traffic in 1941, the branch was reduced to secondary status. There were no signals or cab signals. Crews contacted LEWIS tower for permissions. That said, were Form 19/31's still transcribed, or was the permission simply verbal?

The Milroy Secondary has a rather convoluted divisional heritage.

Lewistown Division

In 1896, the Mifflin & Centre County Railroad merged with the nearby Sunbury & Lewistown Railroad. The PRR executed a new 79 year operating lease on October 1, 1896. It was operated as the Lewistown Division.

The 1900 edition of the CT1000 lists the Milroy line under the Lewistown Division.

June 1, 1900 North & West Branch Railway, Pennsylvania Schuylkill Valley Railroad, Sunbury, Hazleton & Wilkes Barre Railway, and Sunbury & Lewistown Railway merged to form Schuylkill & Juniata Railroad under agreement of Apr. 2, 1900.

Apr. 1, 1902 Schuylkill & Juniata Railroad merged into PRR under agreement of Nov. 27, 1901. The newly absorbed line was detached for operating purposes from the Pennsylvania Railroad Grand Division and became part of the Philadelphia and Erie Grand Division. 

Apr. 1, 1907 Divisional reorganization... Lewistown Division merged with Sunbury Division to form Sunbury & Lewistown Division (also given common officers with Shamokin Division).