prr5848

EMD E units were the backbone of the Pennsy's passenger fleet.


Freight Locomotives


f3 phII early

The PRR acquired hundreds of EMD F-units beginning in July of 1947. Complicating matters for railfans and modelers alike are the many "phases" of units that the railroad purchased. This document intends to point out the spotting features across the various models and phases.

There were 1807 F3/F5 units built, of which the PRR purchased 146 (8%). There were 3849 F7 units built, of which the PRR purchased 164 (4%). There were 372 FP7 units built, of which the PRR purchased 54 (15%).

The PRR did not purchase any of the earlier FT's or F2's, nor the later F9's, FP9's, or FL9's.

Road numbers in bold are in my personal collection (or on order).

 

EMD F3, Class EF15

The EMD F3 is a 1,500-horsepower B-B freight- and passenger-hauling diesel locomotive produced between July 1945 and February 1949 by General Motors’ Electro-Motive Division. Final assembly was at GM-EMD's La Grange, Illinois plant. A total of 1,111 cab-equipped lead A units and 696 cabless booster B units were built.

The F3 was the third model in GM-EMD's highly successful F-unit series of cab unit diesel locomotives, and it was the second most produced of the series. The F3 essentially differed from the EMD F2 in that it used the “new” D12 generator to produce more power and from the later EMD F7 in electrical equipment. Some late-model F3's had the same D27 traction motors, along with the heavier-duty electrical cables, used in the F7, and were referred to as model F5 by EMD's Engineering Department.

The F3 used a 16-cylinder 567B series diesel engine developing 1,500 hp at 800 rpm. The 567 was designed specifically for railroad locomotives, a supercharged 2 stroke 45 degree V type with 567 cu in displacement per cylinder, for a total of 9,072 cu in. A D.C. generator powered four traction motors, two on each Blomberg B truck. EMD has built all of its major components since 1939.

As built, the only way to distinguish between the F2 and F3 was the nose number panels on the A units, which were small on the F2 and large on the F3 and subsequent locomotives. However, these could and were often altered by the railroad. Few F2s were built, however.

Early versions of the F3 had the "chicken wire" grilles along the top edge of the carbody. Later production featured a distinctive fabricated stainless steel grille.

All F-units introduced after the FT have twin exhaust stacks and four electrically powered radiator fans arranged close together atop their roofs, unlike the FT's four stacks and separated and belt driven pairs of fans.

F3 Phases

The identification of locomotive "phases" is a creation of railfans. EMD used no such identification, and instead only kept track of the marketing name (e.g. F2, F3, F7, etc.) and individual locomotives' build (serial) numbers. During the production cycle of a particular model, as design and production techniques improved, all builders would invariably make minor changes. To better keep track of noticeable, and not so noticeable differences in appearance that a locomotive model would acquire during the course of its production run, locomotive historians began documenting any subtle or minor changes made to a particular diesel locomotive model as "phases", and referring to these as such. This practice has proved very popular over the years among diesel locomotive modelers looking to create the most "true to life" models possible.

Despite not being official designations, phase descriptions are quite useful to the diesel spotter and record keeper, but sometimes tricky as many of the changes described are mostly cosmetic and easily altered features of a locomotive - roof fans, body panels, grilles, etc. that could be - and often were - updated or swapped interchangeably during production runs.

The following are normally identified as F3 phases:

Phase I
Built from July 1945. High, flat-topped 36 in (914 mm) roof fans. Top third body panel had "chicken wire" in openings only. Short rear vent panel. Center-third body panel with three equally-spaced porthole windows and D17 traction motors. As-built Phase I F3 units are identical to the F2, they differ only in electrical equipment and numberboard size. Three highly modified locomotives survive from this series, rebuilt as FP10s, all for Metro-North Railroad.

Phase II (early)
Built from February 1947. Top third body panel now had full-length "chicken wire". Long rear vent panel. Center third body panel now had two portholes; area between covered with chicken wire, over 4 smaller rectangular openings.

Phase II (late)
Built from December 1947. Roof radiator fans change to low, pancake fans.

Phase III
Built from March 1948. (Surviving F3's former BAR 42,44,46 are still Phase 2 and were built in MAY 1948) Center third body panel now has no chicken wire between the portholes; the four rectangular openings now have louvres.

Phase IV
Built from August 1948. Chicken wire upper-third panel is replaced with full-length horizontal stainless steel grille.

"F5"
The first "F5A" EMDX demonstrator #59 was built in March 1948. Production of the "F5" started in August 1948 through the end of F3 production in February 1949. The difference between the "F5" and the F3 were the D27 traction motors with heavier-duty cables and higher capacity traction motor blowers fitted. Nearly all previously built F3's received the same upgrades by 1955. A total of 381 F5As and 238 F5Bs were produced. The note in the January 1, 1959 EMD Service Department Locomotive Reference Data states, "All F5 locomotives were delivered as F3 units." All EMD DC traction motors are backwards compatible so as the better motors became available the D37, D47, D57, D67 and D77 all could be found on an F unit.

 

PHASE CHART: EMD F2, F3 & F5 DIESEL LOCOMOTIVES
All Phases here include rectangular-slit type dynamic brakes on both cabs and boosters.
Original tables developed by Jim Fuhrman with details supplied by Ed Hawkins and John Thompson.

Designation F2 F3
Phase1
F3
Phase 2 Early
F3
Phase 2 Late
F3
Phase 3
F3
Phase 4
"F5"
Dates Jul 46 to
Dec 46
Nov-Dec 46>> Feb-May 47>> Dec 47-Apr 48>> Mar-Jun 48>> Aug-Nov 48>> October 48
to Feb 49
Radiator Fans High, flat-top 36" Low-pan-top 36"
Top-third panel Chicken Wire in openings only Full Chicken wire at top third panel Horizontal Stainless Steel Grille
Rear vent opening Short Long
Center-third panel Three equally-spaced portholes Chicken wire between two portholes covering 4 rectangular openings 4 horizontal louvers between two portholes
Electrical Same as FT D17 traction motors D27 traction motors 
w/heavier cables
Number Boards Same as FT Small, streamlined four-digit (see Note 2)
Air Horn N/A Leslie single-note Tyfon A-200 (single, facing forward)

Sample
PRR Roster none none 6 A units
8 B units
16 A units
17 B units
9 A units
7 B units
24 A units 25 A units
12 B units
PRR Photo N/A N/A f3 phII early f3 phII late f3 phIII f3 phIV f5

 Notes:

 1. All F2-F7 Boosters have 3 equally-spaced portholes in the center third panel.

 2. While most roads opted for a large, angled number board, the PRR purchased the standard streamlined (small) four-digit numberboard.

 3. F3 Phase IIb: Hirsimaki's Black Gold, Black Diamonds, Volume Two indicates (p. 42) that the helper units were not equipped with trainphone antennas. But we know from photo evidence that the units were so equipped, but as delivered did not have trainphone antennas. This initial A-B-A helper demonstrator set was delivered to the PRR in January 1948. They served on the Pittsburgh Division and were retired in December 1962. Also during an overhaul in August of 1956 helper unit 9519A was rebuilt to F-5 specifications with heavier traction motor cables, a prime mover from unit 9782B, and the front replacement porthole panel from a phase 2 F-7A thus eliminating the chicken wire in this area of the carbody. It was reclassified EF15a.

 4. F3 Phase IV (F5): For the Pennsy the F-5 units went to work as "Snappers," the F-5 program never impacted the through freight units. Jack Consoli contests the generator as being one of the changes in this phase. However, the fact remains that, for the most part, these units appeared the same externally as the Phase IV's.

 5. The InterMountain F3's in Pennsy livery have incorrect (angled) number boards. It is also worth noting that the parts sprue used to manufacture this locomotive also contains the high fans required for a Phase IIa depiction.

 

Road Numbers Qty Model Delivery HO Scale Models
9500A-9503A
9500B-9503B
4A
4B
F3 Phase 2 Early 7/47

Broadway Limited Imports (9501A, 9501B, 9503A, 9503B)

Precision Craft Models1 (9501A, 9501B)

Athearn Genesis1 (9500A, 9500B, 9501A)

Stewart Hobbies(9501A)

Life Like Proto 10001(9502A, 9502B)

Highliner1 (shell)

9504A-9505A
9504B-9505B
2A
2B
F3 Phase 2 Early 9/47

Precision Craft Models1 (9504A, 9504B)

Highliner1 (shell)

9506A-9517A
9506B-9517B
12A
12B
 F3 Phase 2 Late 4-5/48

Life Like Proto 10001 (9508A)

Highliner1 (shell)

9520A-9528A
9540A-9541A
9520B-9527B
9540B

9A
2A
8B
1B

F3 Phase 2 Late
and
F3 Phase 3
5-7/48 Highliner1 (shell)
9529A-9539A
9556A-9561A
9563A-9567A
9677A-9678A
11A
6A
5A
2A
 F3 Phase 4 9/48

Stewart Hobbies

Highliner1 (shell)

9679A 1A F5  10/48 Highliner1 (shell)
       

Overland

Oriental Limited

1 Model lacks trainphone per prototype.

 

f7 phIa

EMD F7, Class EF15a

The EMD F7 is a 1,500 horsepower Diesel-electric locomotive produced between February 1949 and December 1953 by the Electro-Motive Division of General Motors (EMD) and General Motors Diesel (GMD).

The F7 was the fourth model in GM-EMD's successful line of F unit locomotives, and by far the best-selling cab unit of all time. In fact, more F7s were built than all other F units combined. It succeeded the F3 model in GM-EMD's F unit sequence, and was replaced in turn by the F9. Final assembly was at GM-EMD's La Grange, Illinois, plant or GMD's London, Ontario, facility.

The F7 differed from the F3 primarily in internal equipment (mostly electrical) and some external features. Its continuous tractive effort rating was 20% higher (e.g. 40,000 lb for an F7 with 65 mph gearing, compared to 32,500 lb for an F3 with the same gearing).

The F7's prime mover is a 16-cylinder 567B series Diesel engine developing 1,500 hp at 800 rpm. The 567B is a mechanically aspirated two-stroke design in a 45 degree Vee configuration, with 567 cu in displacement per cylinder, for a total of 9,072 cu in. A direct current generator that is mechanically coupled to the flywheel end of the engine powers four traction motors, with two motors mounted on each Blomberg B truck.

There are no easily identifiable differences between late F3 production and early F7 production; the major differences were all internal electrical system changes. However, no F7 had "chicken wire" grilles of most F3s, and no F3s had later F7 changes described below under Phases.

Phases

The identification of locomotive "phases" is a creation of railfans, although now used in Diesel Spotters Guide. EMD used no such identification, and instead kept track of the marketing name (F7) and individual locomotives' build numbers. During the production cycle of a model, EMD would often make detail changes that were not readily apparent to the casual observer. To keep better track of the variations of locomotives identified the same by the manufacturer, railfans began referring to phases (critical changes to a locomotive line).

Despite not being official designations, the phase description is useful. However, many of the changes described are cosmetic, easily changed features of a locomotive: e.g., roof fans, body panels, grilles and the like could be and sometimes were updated or swapped. Most of the phase differences on the F7 were concerned only with A units; B units varied far less. The following are normally identified as F7 phases:

Phase I (early)
Built from February 1949. Upper grille with horizontal openings. Four horizontal louvred openings on center body panel. 36-inch dynamic brake fan, if dynamic brakes fitted. Flush windshield gasket changed to raised in July 1949. Square cab door corners with kick plates on the steps beneath. Wing window short with square corners. Single drip strip over cab windows and door. Square end door window. Round sand filler cover. Rear overhang.

Phase I (late)
Built from March 1950. Upper grille started out horizontal, as in early Phase I; from March 1951, some locomotives were built with vertical-slotted "Farr-Air" grilles, and by October 1951, all had them. Cab doors became round-cornered, and the kick plates were deleted. The wing windows became taller, with round corners. Two drip strips; one over cab windows, second over door. The end door window became round after November 1950.

Phase II
Built from February 1952. All upper grilles vertical "Farr-Air" type. Center car body louvres became vertical-slotted. Sand filler now with a horizontal, rectangular pull handle. From June 1952, 48-inch (1,219 mm) dynamic brake fans began to be introduced; from October 1952, all dynamic-brake equipped locomotives had them. At that latter date, locomotives no longer had a rear overhang.

 

PHASE CHART: EMD F7 & F9 DIESEL LOCOMOTIVESF7 & F9 cabs and boosters---features as delivered: 
Original tables developed by Jim Fuhrman with details supplied by Ed Hawkins and John Thompson.

Production
phases
F7 Phase 1a (Early) F7 Phase 1b (Late) F7 Phase 1c (Late) F7 Phase 2
to Dec 1953
F9
to Apr 1957
Dates Feb
1949>>
July
1949>>
Mar
1950>>
Nov
1950>>
Mar
1951>>
June
1951>>
Oct
1951>>
Feb
1952>>
June
1952>>
Oct
1952>>
Jan
1954>>
Grille horizontal horizontal or
"Farr Air" vertical
vertical vertical vertical
Louvers 4 horizontal 4 vertical 5 vertical
DB fan 36" 36" 36"/48" 48" 48"
Windshield gasket flush raised raised raised
Door corners,
Kick plates
square.
yes
round,
no
round,
no
round,
no
Wing window short, w/square corners tall, w/round corners tall, w/round corners tall,
round
corners
Drip strip single split, with rounded corners over door split, with rounded corners over door split
End door window square round round round
Sand filler cover round pull handle pull
handle
Rear overhang yes yes no no
Number Boards Small, streamlined four-digit Large, angled five-digit
Air Horn Leslie single-note Tyfon A-200 (single, facing forward)

Sample
Nathan 3-chime M3 (three, forward facing stub bells)

Sample
N/A Leslie Tyfon 3-chime A-125-3E Chime Tone(three, single-note horns, center facing rearward) N/A Leslie 3-chime S-3J (three, forward facing bells, center bell set higher)

Sample
N/A N/A
PRR Roster 20 A units
15 B units
27 A units
15 B units
none 68 A units
28 B units
none 8 A units
18 B units
none none
PRR Photo f7 phIa f7 phIb N/A   N/A   N/A N/A

 Notes:

 1. F7s all rated at 1500 hp.

 2. Boosters all have 3 portholes instead of louvers.

 3. F7 Phase Ia: Initial Pennsy units featured streamlined (small) numberboards. As of July 1949 they switched to the 45-degree, four-digit numberboards. Greg Martin indicates that these units' windshields had raised, exposed gaskets.

 5. F7 Phase IIb/IIc: EMD offered a larger dynamic brake package (with 48" fans) but the PRR didn't purchase it.

 7. Not long after purchase, the units with the rear overhang had their overhang cut off.

 

 

Road Numbers Qty Model Delivery HO Scale Models
9667A-9676A
9667B-9676B
10A
10B
 F7 Phase 1a (Early) 3-7/49

Broadway Limited Imports (9671A, 9671B, 9673A, 9673B)

Athearn Genesis1 (9671A, 9671B, 9674A, 9674B, 9675A, 9675B, 9676A, 9676B)

Walthers (9668A, 9668B, 9671A, 9671B, 9676A, 9676B)

Stewart Hobbies1

Highliner1 (shell)

9640A-9647A
9664A-9665A
9640B-9647B

8A
2A
8B

 F7 Phase 1b (Late) 2-3/50

Broadway Limited Imports (9640A, 9640B, 9642A, 9642B, 9644A, 9644B)

Highliner1 (shell)

9648A-9651A
9662A-9663A
9666A
9648B, 9650B
4A
2A
1A
2B
 F7 Phase 1b (Late) 2-3/50

Broadway Limited Imports (9648A, 9648B, 9649A, 9650A, 9650B)

Walthers (9649A, 9650A)

Highliner1 (shell)

9656A-9661A
9656B-9660B (even)
6A
3B
F7 Phase 1b (Late) 3/50  
9764A-9831A
9656B-9818B (even)
68A
28B
 F7 Phase 1c (Late) 1-6/51

Athearn Genesis (9764A, 9764B, 9765A)

Life Like Proto (9780A, 9780B)

InterMountain(9765A, 9770A, 9776B, 9806A, 9813A, 9825A, 9827A, 9830A)

Stewart Hobbies1

9872A-9879A
9872B-9878B (even)
8A
4B
F7 Phase 2 9/52

Stewart Hobbies1

Highliner1 (shell)

       

Bachman

Overland

Oriental Limited

1 Model lacks trainphone per prototype.

3 The InterMountain F7 in Pennsy livery features a square window on the rear end door, so it should be a Phase Ib. Road numbers and othe spotting features would indicate a Phase Ic. The parts sprue used in the manufacture of this model also includes a round window door, making a correct Phase Ic depiction possible. 

 

 


Helper Service Locomotives


EMD F3 and F7, Class EH15

Road Numbers Qty Model Delivery HO Scale Models
9518A-9519A
9518B 

2A
1B 

 F3 Phase 2 Late  1/48  
9542A-9555A
9542B-9554B (even) 
14A
16B 
 F5  10/48-1/49  
9680A-9683A
9519B, 9528B 
5A
2B 
 F5  1-2/49  
9684A-9689A
9541B-9545B (odd)
9690A-9699A
9547B-9555B (odd) 
6A
3B
10A
5B 

 F5

F7 Phase Ia

 2/49

4/49
 
9652A-9655A
9652B, 9654B
 4A
2B
F7 Phase Ib 2/50   
1 Model lacks trainphone per prototype, 

 


Dual Service Locomotives 


PRR EMD FP7

EMD FP7, Class EFP15

The EMD FP7 is a 1,500 horsepower, B-B dual-service passenger and freight-hauling diesel locomotive produced between June 1949 and December 1953 by General Motors' Electro-Motive Division and General Motors Diesel. Final assembly was at GM-EMD's La Grange, Illinois plant, excepting locomotives destined for Canada, in which case final assembly was at GMD's plant in London, Ontario. The FP7 was essentially EMD's F7A locomotive extended by four feet to give greater water capacity for the steam generator for heating passenger trains.

While EMD's E-units were successful passenger engines, their A1A-A1A wheel arrangement made them less useful in mountainous terrain. Several railroads had tried EMD's F3 in passenger service, but there was insufficient water capacity in an A-unit fitted with dynamic brakes. The real breakthrough came when EMD recognized the problem and added the stretched FP7 to its catalog.

A total of 381 cab-equipped lead A units were built; unlike the freight series, no cabless booster B units were sold. Regular F7B units were sometimes used with FP7 A units, since they, lacking cabs, had more room for water and steam generators. The FP7 and its successor, the FP9, were offshoots of GM-EMD's highly successful F-unit series of cab unit freight diesels.

F3s, F7s, and F9s equipped for passenger service are not FP-series locomotives, which, although similar in appearance, have distinctive differences. This includes, but not limited to, the greater body length. The extra 4 ft of length was added behind the first body-side porthole, and can be recognised by the greater distance between that porthole and the first small carbody filter grille. The corresponding space beneath the body, behind the front truck, was also opened up; this either remained an empty space or was filled with a distinctive water tank shaped like a barrel mounted transversely.

The first two PRR ABA sets (9832A-9832B-9833A and 9834A-9834B-9835A) were painted in the passenger scheme of Tuscan Red with five Buff stripes. The remaining units were painted in the standard freight scheme.

Nathan M3 air horns.

Road Numbers Qty Delivery HO Models
9832A-9871A
9832B-9858B (even)
42A
12B
4-8/52

Athearn Genesis (9834A3, 9834B3, 9835A39844A, 9844B, 9852A2, 9860A2, 9862A2, 9866A, 9871A2)

Walthers Proto (9836A2, 9836B2 9846A2, 9846B2, 9854A2, 9854B2, 9858A2, 9858B2, 9861A2, 9863A2, 9867A2, 9870A2)

InterMountain1 (9553B, 9650B, 9657B, 9764B, 9838A, 9840A, 9840B, 9841A, 9852A, 9852B, 9853A, 9858B, 9865A)

E-R Models1

Overland

Oriental Limited

1 Model lacks trainphone per prototype,

2 Dark Green Locomotive Enamel.

3 Tuscan Red, five-stripe.

 


Passenger Locomotives


PRR EMD E7

EMD E7, Class EP20

The E7 was a 2,000-horsepower, A1A-A1A passenger train locomotive built by General Motors' Electro-Motive Division of La Grange, Illinois. 428 cab versions, or E7As, were built from February 1945 to April 1949; 82 booster E7Bs were built from March 1945 to July 1948. (The 2,000 hp came from two 12 cylinder model 567A engines. Each engine drove its own electrical generator to power the two traction motors on one truck. The E7 was the eighth model in a line of passenger diesels of similar design known as EMD E-units, and it became the best selling E model upon its introduction.

In profile the front of the nose of an E7A was less slanted than on earlier EMD passenger locomotives, and the E7, E8, and E9 units have been nicknamed “bulldog nose” units. Some earlier units were called “shovel nose” units or “slant nose” units.

Road Numbers Qty Delivery HO Scale Models
5900A-5901A 2A 9/45  
5840A-5855A
5840B-5854B (even)
16A
8B
8-9/47

Broadway Limited Imports (5840A1, 5840B2, 5841A4, 5842A1, 5842B1, 5843A4, 5844A, 5844B, 5846A1, 5846B1, 5847A1, 5850A1, 5850B1, 5851A1, 5852B1

Walthers (5840A25848B2)

Life Like Proto 2000 (5842A1, 5842B1)

5856A-5865A
5856B-5864B (even)
5900B

10A
5B
1B

1/47  
5866A-5879A
5880B-5883B (even)
14A
4B
6-11/48  
     

Bachman

Oriental Limited

Sunset

1 Dark Green Locomotive Enamel, five-stripe.

2 Tuscan Red, five-stripe.

3 Tuscan Red, single broad stripe.

4 Tuscan Red, unknown stripe.

 

PRR EMD E8

EMD E8, Class EP22

The E8 was a 2,250-horsepower, A1A-A1A passenger-train locomotive built by General Motors' Electro-Motive Division (EMD) of La Grange, Illinois. A total of 450 cab versions, or E8As, were built from August 1949 to January 1954, 447 for the U.S. and 3 for Canada. And 46 E8Bs were built from December 1949 to January 1954, all for the U.S. The 2,250 hp came from two 12 cylinder model 567B engines, each driving a generator to power the two traction motors on one truck. The E8 was the ninth model in the line of passenger diesels of similar design known as EMD E-units. Starting in September 1953, a total of 21 E8As were built which used either the 567BC or 567C engines.

In profile the front of the nose of E7, E8, and E9 units is less slanted than earlier EMD units, and E7/8/9s (and their four axle cousins, the F-unit series) have been nicknamed "bulldog nose" units. Earlier E-unit locomotives were nicknamed "slant nose" units. 

Road Numbers Qty Delivery HO Scale Models
5884A-5893A 10A 3-4/50  
5808A-5810A
5835A-5839A
5894A-5899A
5902A-5905A
10A 8/50  Life Like Proto 20005 (5894A2, 5898A2)
5765A-5769A
5788A-5799A
5801A-5807A
24A 5/51

Broadway Limited Imports (5765A1, 5766A1, 5801A3, 5802A4, 5803A2, 5806A3, 5807a4, 5893A3)

Walthers (5803A, 5804A2, 5807A2)

Life Like Proto 20005 (5804A2)

5700A-5716A
5760A-5764A
22A 9-11/52

Broadway Limited Imports (5703A3, 5710A2, 5711A3, 5712A2, 5713A2, 5716A3)

Life Like 20005 (5713A3)

     

Overland

Oriental Limited

1 Dark Green Locomotive Enamel, five-stripe.

2 Tuscan Red, five-stripe.

3 Tuscan Red, single broad stripe.

4 Tuscan Red, unknown stripe.

5 Model lacks Trainphone per prototype.