As of 1884 (interpreted from Form 76), the Pennsylvania Railroad -- which did not include "Lines West of Pittsburgh" -- was organized into Grand Divisions, Divisions, and Railroads. Railroads represented in bold are included in the listings but are believed to be independent railroads (many are confirmed so).

As of 1923 (interpreted from Form CT1000), the Pennsylvania Railroad was organized into Regions, Divisions, and Railroads. Railroads represented in bold are included in the listings but are believed to be independent railroads (many are confirmed so).

Central Region data courtesy of Robert Netzlof. (Anyone have the Western Region?)

Andy Miller (PRR_Talk list) shares his thoughts on the HO scale Pullman Sleeper offered by Bachmann Spectrum:


I finally got a Bachmann Pullman today. Why does B do these things?? Its terribly frustrating to see them do such a fine job of mold making, include interiors, metal truck, lights, Kadee-compatible couplers; and then just ignore the prototype!

I did some research. This very rare car did exist. For those interested here's what I dug up in the Wayner reprint of the Pullman Co's 1950 list of cars:

scheme1 p

by Bob Reid

From Pennsy Journal, V1 #1.

One of the more unusual models of diesel road power on the Pennsy was the passenger sharks. In their final days on the Long Branch, they attracted more railfans from all over the country in a effort to capture on film their operation. Only the Baldwin Centipedes surpassed the passenger sharks in my interest of Pennsy diesel power.

Bob Johnson's comments, as coordinator of the archives of the PRRT&HS:

1 - As built in 1-1929 to 4-1929 the cars had no side ladders and had the end ladders on the right side of the ends as you stand facing the end of the car. The side sill steps at the ends were a two-step style.

2 - About 1932 some, but not all, R50B cars began to receive freight car safety appliances. This added side ladders, changed the side sill steps to a single-step type, moved the end ladders to the left side, moved the brake wheel, added a brake platform, added a platform above the end ladders, and modified many handholds.

3 - On 4-3-1940 a second handhold was added on the left end of the sides of R50B cars with freight car safety appliances, but not to cars that kept the original configuration.

4 - On 12-18-1942 the end details described in #2 above were made standard for all R50B cars. This made a new variation with full freight car safety appliances on the ends, but no side ladders. I haven't seen any photos of this variation.

5 - Beginning in 1952 the running boards and side ladders were removed.

mbsImage1NMRA-MER MEETING 31 MARCH 2001 - FRAZER, PA

MANUAL BLOCK SIGNAL SYSTEMS

THE INFORMATION HEREIN IS EXCERPTED FROM CHAPTER 7- MANAGEMENT OF TRAIN OPERATIONS - FROM "THE PRR IN THE SHENANGO VALLEY"

COPYRIGHT 2001 BY ALAN B. BUCHAN

MANUAL BLOCK SIGNAL TERRITORY

A Manual Block Signal system, the earliest form of block signaling, is nothing more than a series of sections of track, typically between stations (known as blocks) governed by fixed signals located at the entrance to the block (known as block signals), operated manually by the block operator, based on information received from the dispatcher by telegraph, telephone or radio.

divisions41 68

By Ed Spodobalski

[This article is presented in its entirety as it appeared in the December 1978 issue of Rails Northeast. No attempt is being made to present it here as original work. We have no means of contacting the original author, though the original publisher has indicated no offense in republication. We hope that the author would approve of its republication here and we are prepared to remove it if requested to do so. Also note that the content of the article is one of reporting simple facts as determined from actual PRR publications and it does not contain conjecture or personal opinion on the part of the author. Therefore, any researcher could arrive at the same data fairly readily.]

Subcategories

The Track Segment series documents track segments as indicated in the CT1000 of 1945 in conjunction with the Employee Timetables of 1954. Where available, locations indicated may link to a corresponding On Location series article for more detailed information.

The On Location series takes a deep dive into a Pennsylvania Railroad location as indicated within the CT1000 - List of Stations and Sidings.

The Interchange series contains articles about railroads that interchanged with the Pennsy, including fleet statistics and paint schemes with era-appropriateness guidance.