Paragon2ReadingT120130912 0002.1The Pennsy was known to operate on its rails locomotives which it did not own. These inclued railroad test units, builder test units, demonstrators, and leased units.

Railroad Test Units

July and August, 1924: The PRR borrowed a 37-ton GE gas-electic at the piers in New York City.

1937: The PRR borrowed an EMC 600 hp switcher for potential use at the General Motors plant in Linden, New Jersey. The Pennsy purchased the unit afterwards -- Class ES6 #5911.

1947: The Pennsy tested an F-M H20-44 as a potential helper west of Altoona. They eventually went with EMD F3's for this purpose, in an A-B-A configuration.

PRR GP7 8553 1


Four Axle General Purpose (GP) Road Switchers


The following tables illustrate the various spotting features of EMD GP7 and GP9 units purchased by the Pennsylvania Railroad. The basis for these tables are from a Jim Williams presentation at the May 2000 annual meeting of the Pennsylvania Railroad Technical & Historical Society.

EMD GP7 vs. GP9

  GP-7 GP-9
Build Dates October 1949
- May 1954
January 1954
- December 1959
Horsepower 1500 1750
Louvers at Rear of Car Body 2 Full Rows 1 Single Louver
Louvers on Battery Box 3 Single Louvers 1 Louver

 

6678627217dffa41dde5a7ebc94e5c1b

EMD SW / SW1, Class ES6

The EMD SW1 is a 600-horsepower diesel-electric switcher locomotive built by General Motors' Electro-Motive Corporation (later Division) between December 1938 and November 1953. Final assembly was at EMD's plant at LaGrange (McCook) Illinois. The SW1 was the second generation of 3,402 cu in (55.75 L) switcher from EMD, succeeding the SC (cast frame) and SW (welded frame). The most significant change from those earlier models was the use of an engine of EMD's own design, the then-new 567 engine, here in 600 hp V6 form. 661 locomotives of this design were built, no SW1s were built after March 1943 until production started again in September 1945.

Like most long-running locomotive models, a number of changes were made to the SW1 over its production life. Internally, the post-war locomotives were somewhat improved, and used the 567A engine.

Employee timetables provide a treasure trove of information about a division. They were typically updated in April and September. They include listings of interlockings and block stations, passenger train schedules, arranged freight train schedules, and rules specific to the division.

prr alco fa1

 

Alco FA1 / FB1, Class AF15

The ALCO FA was a family of B-B diesel locomotives designed to haul freight trains. The locomotives were built by a partnership of ALCO and General Electric in Schenectady, New York, between January 1946 and May 1959. They were of a cab unit design, and both cab-equipped lead (A unit) FA and cabless booster (B unit) FB models were built. A dual passenger-freight version, the FPA/FPB, was also offered. It was equipped with a steam generator for heating passenger cars.

 AMB 141 2 09543.1504129027

Station Location HO Scale Model  
Centre Hall, Pa. Branchline centre hall
New Freedom, Pa. American Model Builders #AMB-141  newfreedom
North Philadelphia, Pa. DESIGNDYNE on Shapeways  
Perryville, Md. DESIGNDYNE on Shapeways perryville
Spring City, Pa. Scientific Models #60482 spring city
Wilmington, De. Trainstuff (defunct)
DESIGNDYNE on Shapeways
 
  Walthers #933-3553 PRR Plan 55704
Type B-101
Brick Combination Station

1280px Train Overlook Cassandra panoramio 7

Many years ago, at a Pennsylvania Railroad Technical & Historical Society annual meeting in Ohio, I procured a packet of documentation pertaining to MO tower at Cresson, Pa. The notes started in the early 19-teens and extended through the end of Pennsy.

One section included a study conducted during the middle of World War II to determine the feasibility of installing bi-directional signalling between SO (South Fork) and MO (Cresson) on the west slope. In a form dated April 7, 1942, Pittsburgh Division management requested authorization for the expenditure of $149,883 for "Reverse signals on number three track -- "MO" to "SO" and changes to crossovers at interlockings". The justification was as follows:

RR 37066wlRed Caboose (InterMountain) X29 - Available in numerous configurations and schemes

Between 1924 and 1934, the Pennsylvania Railroad purchased or built over 30,000 of the X29 class of box cars and an additional 5,000 of the auto car variant, the X28. The X29 -- a 40' 50-ton all-steel car -- became the most ubiquitous freight car of the late steam/transition era. These cars appeared in every corner of the US and Canada. 

mo tower

The following table lists HO scale models of Pennsylvania Railroad towers that have been produced. Not all models indicated are readily available.

 sunnyside

Based on the Pennsylvania Railroad Passenger Equipment Register dated 9/26/54.

A link in the Class column performs a search on the Varnish database and returns the individual car roster. However, the database performs a "contains" search, so a search on class "P70f" will also return "P70fa" records, etc., but not vice versa.

Note that during 1954, the Pennsy dropped the "R" suffix from the class designation which previously indicated air conditioning.

Subcategories

The Track Segment series documents track segments as indicated in the CT1000 of 1945 in conjunction with the Employee Timetables of 1954. Where available, locations indicated may link to a corresponding On Location series article for more detailed information.

The On Location series takes a deep dive into a Pennsylvania Railroad location as indicated within the CT1000 - List of Stations and Sidings.

The Interchange series contains articles about railroads that interchanged with the Pennsy, including fleet statistics and paint schemes with era-appropriateness guidance.