The Pennsy Modeler

In order to portray Pennsylvania Railroad and interchange partners as accurately as possible, this blog contains articles which are essentially notes to myself, but are shared should the community desire the same information.

7001LargeFunaro & Camerlengo X28A - Available with multiple brake and door configurations.

The PRR’s X28 boxcar was developed from a combination of the evolution of lessons learned with the X25 fleet and the ARA mandate for standardized single-sheathed 50 ton boxcars. The X28 was an automobile version of the ARA boxcar, although based on a PRR design. The first 1,000 cars of the 5,000 car fleet were equipped with corrugated Youngstown doors, with the remaining 4,000 equipped with three-panel car builder doors. The X28 fleet was built during 1924 and 1926. Following development of the X31 “wagontop” boxcar in 1933 by the PRR, the X28 Automobile version was deemed obsolete and a rebuild program from 7/1933 to 7/1935 removed the double door configuration to only a single door creating the X28a. Nearly the entire X28 fleet was converted to the X28a class. By 1955, 3,500 X28a remained and by 1968, only 8 were still on the roster. (Source: www.mountvernonshops.com)

8260LargeFunaro & Camerlengo X42

The X42 was created following WW2 when head-end mail and express traffic took off across the nation. For the PRR it was cheaper to build a boxcar with door spacing and dimensions similar to a B60 baggage car for bulk mail shipments. This unique boxcar was classed as an X42, and 10 of the 60' cars were built between August and September of 1950, series 2540-2549. Equipped with steam and signal lines like an express car, it was initially painted in the Circle Keystone Scheme used for freight. However, in a May 1951 paint & lettering diagram, the scheme was made obsolete when all X42 were repainted into a unique Tuscan Red Passenger scheme. The car sides and ends were painted Tuscan Red. The roof, underbody, and trucks were painted black. The side lettering was Gold Leaf and the end lettering was white. All 10 X42’s were later painted into the Shadow Keystone Scheme with some later receiving the Plain Keystone monogram as well. The entire fleet of 10 cars lasted into Penn Central. (Source: Mount Vernon Shops)

Alco Pass Shark


Freight Locomotives


Baldwin DR 4-4-1500 "Early Shark", Class BF15 / BF15a

The Baldwin DR-4-4-15 was a 1,500-horsepower cab unit-type diesel locomotive built for freight service by the Baldwin Locomotive Works between November 1947 and June 1950. It was produced in two different body types, nicknamed the "Babyface" and "Sharknose" styles by railfans, though Baldwin used the same model number for both. 22 "Babyface" cab-equipped A units were built, along with 11 cabless booster B units; 36 "Sharknose" A units and 36 B units were constructed, making a total for all models of 105 locomotives built.

 55462Bowser X33

In 1932 the PRR designed boxcars that would be specifically used for the automobile industry. To maximize capacity they used a new unique roof design, where it curved at the edge, termed a “round roof” or “wagontop”. The X32 and X33 classes were both 50 '6" cars with staggered doors. The X33 differed from the X32 in that it also had end doors. Both X32 and X33 cars were built in 1933. Then, in 1936 after some design improvements, the X32a and X33a classes were constructed. The X33 class was specifically designed for carrying finished automobiles.

Although considered large capacity when first built in 1933, line side clearance improvements made the cars obsolete, so in 1959 the PRR stripped the superstructure of 1,000 X32 and X33 subclasses cars to build their X51 class of boxcars. By April of 1968, the PRR only had less than a dozen X32/X33 cars in revenue service. (Source: www.mountvernonshops.com)

prr5848

EMD E units were the backbone of the Pennsy's passenger fleet.

Railworks X30

The PRR built one X30 class 70' 6" box car in Sept. 1931 for the express purpose of shipping fire equipment from the American LaFrance plant in Elmira, N.Y. It was designed to haul their longest, at the time, ladder truck from the plant to any destination on the continent. It featured double 6' Youngstown doors, an end door. As built, the lettering read "EXPERIMENTAL" but was shortly thereafter changed to "AUTOMOBILES".

This car has been produced in brass by Railworks.

emd fp7 f7b loksound 5 sound and dcc 920 42512 big

Another collection of notes unrelated to the Pennsy... but hey, it's my web site!

The National Railroad Passenger Corporation, doing business as Amtrak (reporting marks AMTK, AMTZ), is a passenger railroad service that provides medium and long-distance intercity service in the contiguous United States and to nine Canadian cities.

Founded in 1971 as a quasi-public corporation to operate many U.S. passenger rail services, it receives a combination of state and federal subsidies but is managed as a for-profit organization. Amtrak's headquarters is located one block west of Union Station in Washington, D.C.

 Bowser X32

In 1932 the PRR designed boxcars that would be specifically used for the automobile industry. To maximize capacity they used a new unique roof design, where it curved at the edge, termed a “round roof” or “wagontop”. The X32 and X33 classes were both 50 '6" cars with staggered doors. The X33 differed from the X32 in that it also had end doors. Both X32 and X33 cars were built in 1933. Then, in 1936 after some design improvements, the X32a and X33a classes were constructed. While the X33 class was specifically designed for carrying finished automobiles, the X32 boxcar classes, while designed to haul finished automobiles also hauled auto parts around the country as well. The resulting need for specific service X32’s resulted in different batches and classes being built, which introduced the X32b class. In 1940 auto loading racks were applied to some X32b, which created the X32c class. Finally, starting in 1953 through to 1956, X32a/b/c boxcars were rebuilt with a single door into the X32d class.

Although considered large capacity when first built in 1933, line side clearance improvements made the cars obsolete, so in 1959 the PRR stripped the superstructure of 1,000 X32 and X33 subclasses cars to build their X51 class of boxcars. By April of 1968, the PRR only had less than a dozen X32/X33 cars in revenue service. (Source: www.mountvernonshops.com)

srlx 5839

739f8a8fc50c9dfb40d7817f2bd386b0 swift galleriesThe Swift fleet (S.R.L.X.) was part of the General American Transportation Corp. (wood car division) fleet.

Although I have not researched their paint schemes for absolute accuracy, someone posted the following information to the Atlas HO Scale Forum in July 2005:

Screen Shot 2020 06 11 at 6.47.34 PM

Tangent Scale Models G31B

The G31 series were the first post-war gondolas, introduced in November 1948. The class featured a 52'-6" interior length and a fishbelly design. These cars lasted well past the Penn Central merger. Sub-classes ran from A through N and included multiple builders and spotting features.

H BT Huntingdon Broad Top Railraod Locomotive Coal Car in Saxton Bedford County in 1953jpg

Huntingdon & Broad Top Mountain Railroad (H&BTM) (reporting mark HBTM) is a former short line railroad company operating passenger and freight service on standard gauge track in south central Pennsylvania.

Operational headquarters were in Huntingdon, and Saxton, with financial and business offices located in Philadelphia. The primary shop facilities were located in Saxton; auxiliary car shop facilities were at Huntington. Turntables were located at Huntingdon, Saxton, and Mount Dallas, Pennsylvania.