The Pennsy Modeler

In order to portray Pennsylvania Railroad and interchange partners as accurately as possible, this blog contains articles which are essentially notes to myself, but are shared should the community desire the same information.

Articles are sorted by modification date, so if an existing article receives an update it will be presented at the top of the list again.

I've visited the following Pennsylvania Railroad model railroads and consider them to have a high degree of fidelity to the prototype. They are not freelance, protolance, etc., but depict specific locales on the Pennsy based on historic documentation.

mbsImage1NMRA-MER MEETING 31 MARCH 2001 - FRAZER, PA

MANUAL BLOCK SIGNAL SYSTEMS

THE INFORMATION HEREIN IS EXCERPTED FROM CHAPTER 7- MANAGEMENT OF TRAIN OPERATIONS - FROM "THE PRR IN THE SHENANGO VALLEY"

COPYRIGHT 2001 BY ALAN B. BUCHAN

MANUAL BLOCK SIGNAL TERRITORY

A Manual Block Signal system, the earliest form of block signaling, is nothing more than a series of sections of track, typically between stations (known as blocks) governed by fixed signals located at the entrance to the block (known as block signals), operated manually by the block operator, based on information received from the dispatcher by telegraph, telephone or radio.

1956

The economic success of the railroads depended on freight shipped in full cars. The idea of putting truck trailers on flatcars was a method of moving less-than-carload shipments economically. This "intermodal" concept held the hope of competing with trucks which were taking more and more of this business from the railroads.

In the mid-thirties, the Chicago, the Great Western and then the New Haven railroads began piggy back service limited to their own railroad. By 1953, the CB&Q, the Eastern Illinois and the Southern Pacific railroads had joined the innovation. Most cars were surplus 50's flatcars equipped with new decks by the railroads. By 1955, an additional 25 railroads had begun some form of piggy back service. A significant legal battle between the truckers and the railroads resulted in a ruling permitting interstate piggy back service using either railroad or privately owned trailers. The stage was set for rapid expansion of intermodal services.

As of 1923 (interpreted from Form CT1000), the Pennsylvania Railroad was organized into Regions, Divisions, and Railroads. Railroads represented in bold are included in the listings but are believed to be independent railroads (many are confirmed so).

Central Region data courtesy of Robert Netzlof. (Anyone have the Western Region?)

f30d w trailer

The F30 were 50' flat cars and the predominant flat car class on the Pennsy roster during the 1950s.

As of 1884 (interpreted from Form 76), the Pennsylvania Railroad -- which did not include "Lines West of Pittsburgh" -- was organized into Grand Divisions, Divisions, and Railroads. Railroads represented in bold are included in the listings but are believed to be independent railroads (many are confirmed so).

Kessler 12 5 Maple Brook

Dennis Sautters, a PRRT&HS member from Ohio, operates a business called Laser Horizons. He offers laser cut passenger sides for many PRR passenger cars. As of May 19, 2011, the following were currently offered:

As of 1900 (interpreted from Form CT1000), the Pennsylvania Railroad -- which did not include "Lines West of Pittsburgh" -- was organized into Grand Divisions, Divisions, and Railroads. Railroads represented in bold are included in the listings but are believed to be independent railroads (many are confirmed so).

When is an EMD "F7A" an "EF15a"? When it's owned by the Pennsylvania Rail Road!

The Pennsy - The Standard Railroad Of The World - had its own system of classifying diesel locomotives, rather than relying on the designations appointed by the builders of the units.

With very few exceptions, the Pennsy's diesels were classed using the following multiple character formula:

Andy Miller (PRR_Talk list) shares his thoughts on the HO scale Pullman Sleeper offered by Bachmann Spectrum:


I finally got a Bachmann Pullman today. Why does B do these things?? Its terribly frustrating to see them do such a fine job of mold making, include interiors, metal truck, lights, Kadee-compatible couplers; and then just ignore the prototype!

I did some research. This very rare car did exist. For those interested here's what I dug up in the Wayner reprint of the Pullman Co's 1950 list of cars: